Impacting Lives of Beginners: Mrs. Neena Bhatia, Principal ABC Public School

Impacting Lives of Beginners: Mrs. Neena Bhatia, Principal ABC Public School

  Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My father was my inspiration in Childhood. He always preached us that luck sure comes at the door and knocks too but your efforts More »

Top of the Town: Ravindra Bhadana, MLA  Indian politician and a member of the 16th Legislative Assembly of Uttar Pradesh of India

Top of the Town: Ravindra Bhadana, MLA Indian politician and a member of the 16th Legislative Assembly of Uttar Pradesh of India

1. आपका बचपन में प्रेरणा स्त्रोत कौन था? मेरे पूज्य बाबाजी स्वर्गीय श्री रामसिंह जी । जो एक कृषक थे, एक सामाजिक व्यक्ति थे। उन्होंने जिंदगी में मुझे जीना सीखाया। प्ररेणा भी More »

Top of the Town: Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd.

Top of the Town: Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd.

Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd. with 300+ Centers all across India Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My mother and father were my source More »

Top of the town: Dr. Mohini Lamba, Director in American Kids Play School, Early Childhood Curriculum Developer, Montessori Teachers Trainer

Top of the town: Dr. Mohini Lamba, Director in American Kids Play School, Early Childhood Curriculum Developer, Montessori Teachers Trainer

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My inspiration was my family. I was surrounded by educators in my family. Ma Nanaji, Mamaji, my mother everybody was into academics. My Mamaji was More »

Top of the Town: Mrs. Monika Kohli, 52 years young model and actor, into print ads, T.V. commercials and movies

Top of the Town: Mrs. Monika Kohli, 52 years young model and actor, into print ads, T.V. commercials and movies

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? I always believed that inspiration is from inside and not from outside. Only you can inspire yourself. Outward inspirations are momentary and do not stay More »

Top of the town: Respected Rajendra Aggarwal, MP

Top of the town: Respected Rajendra Aggarwal, MP

  Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My dad and my uncle were my inspiration in my childhood. Both of them were associated with RSS. They inspired me to join RSS More »

Top of the town: Dr. Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker

Top of the town: Dr. Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker

Dr.Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My mother was my inspiration in my childhood and she is still my inspiration. My brother had also More »

Top of the town: Mr. Rakesh Kohli, Chairman, Stag International known for sporting goods in different countries of the world.

Top of the town: Mr. Rakesh Kohli, Chairman, Stag International known for sporting goods in different countries of the world.

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My grandfather was my biggest inspiration. I had learnt the minutest details of life from him. I learnt a lot from him about business. Like More »

Top of the town: Mr. Prem Mehta, Principal City Vocational Public School

Top of the town: Mr. Prem Mehta, Principal City Vocational Public School

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? I think in my childhood it was the national leaders like Gandhi ji and Nehru ji who inspired me the most because our exposure at More »

Top of the town: Dr. Mamta Varshney, Lecturer and Poetess

Top of the town: Dr. Mamta Varshney, Lecturer and Poetess

Who was your inspiration in Childhood? Radio was my source of inspiration as I used to listen to loads of music and radio and tape recorder were the only source to listen More »

 

N. Korean leader removes major nuclear sticking point: Seoul

SEOUL: South Korean President Moon Jae-in said Thursday that his rival, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, isn’t asking for the withdrawal of US troops from the Korean Peninsula as a precondition for abandoning his nuclear weapons. If true, this would seem to remove a major sticking point to a potential nuclear disarmament deal.

North Korea, a small, authoritarian nation surrounded by bigger and richer neighbors, has always linked its pursuit of nuclear weapons to what it calls a “hostile” US policy that is embodied by the 28,500 US troops stationed in South Korea, the 50,000 stationed in Japan, and the “nuclear umbrella” security guarantee that Washington offers allies Seoul and Tokyo.

Although Moon reported that North Korea isn’t asking for the US troops to leave, he said the North still wants the United States to end its “hostile” policy and offer security guarantees. When North Korea has previously talked about “hostility” it has been linked to the US troops in South Korea.

It won’t be until Moon and Kim meet next week, and then when Kim is to meet US President Donald Trump sometime in May or June, that outsiders might know just what North Korea intends. Until then, caution is needed over the statements the various leaders are using to set up their high-stakes negotiations.

Moon and Kim’s summit on April 27 will be only the third such meeting between the countries’ leaders. Moon, a liberal who is committed to engaging the North despite being forced to take a hard line in the face of repeated North Korean weapons tests last year, is eager to make the summit a success and pave the way for Kim and Trump to settle the deep differences they have over the North’s decades-long pursuit of nuclear weapons.

Many analysts believe that Kim sees the meeting with Trump as a way to bestow legitimacy on his own leadership and on a rogue nuclear program that he has built in the face of international criticism and crippling sanctions. Many say it is unlikely that the North will trade away its hard-won nuclear weapons without getting what it wants in return.

“North Korea is expressing a commitment to a complete denuclearization,” Moon said during a meeting with the heads of media organizations in South Korea on Thursday. “They are not presenting a condition that the US cannot accept, such as the withdrawal of the American troops in South Korea. … North Korea is only talking about the end of a hostile policy against it and then a security guarantee for the country.”

Trump revealed Tuesday that the US and North Korea had been holding direct talks at “extremely high levels” in preparation for their summit. Trump also said that North and South Korea are negotiating an end to hostilities before next week’s summit.

North Korea has long sought a peace treaty with the United States to formally end the 1950-53 Korean War. Some South Koreans fear the North could use such a treaty as a pretext for demanding the withdrawal of the American troops in the South. Some worry that potential discussions on formally ending the war may distract from already difficult efforts to rid the North of nuclear weapons and apply robust verification of that process.

The armistice that halted fighting in the war was signed by the US-led United Nations Command, North Korea and China. South Korea was a member of the U.N. Command but was not a direct signatory.

In their previous summit in 2007, the Koreas declared a commitment toward ending the war and vowed to pursue discussions with others. But the efforts faltered and relations between the rivals worsened after a conservative government took office in Seoul in February 2008.

Germany's Angela Merkel appears open to compromise on EU reforms

BERLIN: German Chancellor Angela Merkel signaled her willingness to find compromises with France when it comes to reforming the European Union, as she hosted French President Emmanuel Macron for talks Thursday in Berlin.

Macron has outlined ambitious plans for greater economic integration across the 28-nation bloc, but his proposals have met resistance in some member countries, including among conservatives in Merkel’s party.

Merkel, who was recently confirmed for a fourth term at the helm of Europe’s biggest economy, said at the very least she is willing to talk.

“There are of course always different starting points when it comes to the opinions of Germany and France,” she told reporters at a joint news conference with Macron. “We need open debates _ and in the end we need the ability to compromise.”

While Germany and France agree on the need to better protect the EU‘s external borders and forge a common asylum policy, it’s unclear how much backing Macron can expect from Germany for his plans to reform the bloc’s financial structure.

In their deal to form a new German government, Merkel’s conservative party and its center-left partners agreed that Germany like France is prepared to pay more into the EU budget.

But Berlin has been skeptical in its response so far to the possibility of a shared budget and Merkel is lukewarm about Macron’s idea of a eurozone finance minister.

The French president made clear he won’t drop his demand for greater financial solidarity, particularly among the 19 countries that share the euro as a currency, which includes both Germany and France.

“No currency union can survive if there aren’t instruments for convergence,” Macron said, citing the need for a banking union something Germany has resisted for fear of being held liable for future bailouts abroad.

Merkel said Germany would be willing to agree in the long term to a pan-European deposit insurance scheme, but insisted that solidarity shouldn’t undermine economic competitiveness among the bloc’s economies.

Macron’s flying visit to Berlin started at the unfinished Humboldt Forum, a museum that’s being built on the site where the German Kaiser’s palace stood until it was largely destroyed in World War II. The forum is named after the brothers Alexander and Wilhelm von Humboldt, two 19th-century German intellectuals who spent many years in Paris.

Both leaders noted the intentional symbolism of their visit to the building site at a time when Europe is being reshaped.

Closed doors talks between Merkel and Macron later Thursday were likely to touch on Europe’s stance on the crisis in Syria and the fate of the nuclear deal with Iran.

Both leaders fly to Washington next week for separate meetings with President Donald Trump at which those issues will play a central role.

France and Germany were part of the six-nation group that negotiated the 2015 deal to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons, and both countries are keen to prevent it from falling apart when Trump’s May 12 deadline for major changes to the pact expires.

On Syria, Berlin’s decision not to join the U.S., Britain and France in attacking suspected chemical weapons sites last week highlighted Germany’s hesitancy when it comes to military action abroad. Berlin has stressed the need for a diplomatic solution to the war that’s seen more than 700,000 Syrians seek refuge in Germany at considerable political cost to Merkel, who insists that giving them shelter has been the right thing to do.

Germany's Angela Merkel appears open to compromise on EU reforms

BERLIN: German Chancellor Angela Merkel signaled her willingness to find compromises with France when it comes to reforming the European Union, as she hosted French President Emmanuel Macron for talks Thursday in Berlin.

Macron has outlined ambitious plans for greater economic integration across the 28-nation bloc, but his proposals have met resistance in some member countries, including among conservatives in Merkel’s party.

Merkel, who was recently confirmed for a fourth term at the helm of Europe’s biggest economy, said at the very least she is willing to talk.

“There are of course always different starting points when it comes to the opinions of Germany and France,” she told reporters at a joint news conference with Macron. “We need open debates _ and in the end we need the ability to compromise.”

While Germany and France agree on the need to better protect the EU‘s external borders and forge a common asylum policy, it’s unclear how much backing Macron can expect from Germany for his plans to reform the bloc’s financial structure.

In their deal to form a new German government, Merkel’s conservative party and its center-left partners agreed that Germany like France is prepared to pay more into the EU budget.

But Berlin has been skeptical in its response so far to the possibility of a shared budget and Merkel is lukewarm about Macron’s idea of a eurozone finance minister.

The French president made clear he won’t drop his demand for greater financial solidarity, particularly among the 19 countries that share the euro as a currency, which includes both Germany and France.

“No currency union can survive if there aren’t instruments for convergence,” Macron said, citing the need for a banking union something Germany has resisted for fear of being held liable for future bailouts abroad.

Merkel said Germany would be willing to agree in the long term to a pan-European deposit insurance scheme, but insisted that solidarity shouldn’t undermine economic competitiveness among the bloc’s economies.

Macron’s flying visit to Berlin started at the unfinished Humboldt Forum, a museum that’s being built on the site where the German Kaiser’s palace stood until it was largely destroyed in World War II. The forum is named after the brothers Alexander and Wilhelm von Humboldt, two 19th-century German intellectuals who spent many years in Paris.

Both leaders noted the intentional symbolism of their visit to the building site at a time when Europe is being reshaped.

Closed doors talks between Merkel and Macron later Thursday were likely to touch on Europe’s stance on the crisis in Syria and the fate of the nuclear deal with Iran.

Both leaders fly to Washington next week for separate meetings with President Donald Trump at which those issues will play a central role.

France and Germany were part of the six-nation group that negotiated the 2015 deal to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons, and both countries are keen to prevent it from falling apart when Trump’s May 12 deadline for major changes to the pact expires.

On Syria, Berlin’s decision not to join the U.S., Britain and France in attacking suspected chemical weapons sites last week highlighted Germany’s hesitancy when it comes to military action abroad. Berlin has stressed the need for a diplomatic solution to the war that’s seen more than 700,000 Syrians seek refuge in Germany at considerable political cost to Merkel, who insists that giving them shelter has been the right thing to do.

Djokovic stunned by Thiem in Monte Carlo

Novak Djokovic was knocked out of the Monte Carlo Masters by an inspired Dominic Thiem in the third round on Thursday, with the Austrian fifth seed progressing to a possible quarter-final with Rafael Nadal.

Djokovic stunned by Thiem in Monte Carlo

Novak Djokovic was knocked out of the Monte Carlo Masters by an inspired Dominic Thiem in the third round on Thursday, with the Austrian fifth seed progressing to a possible quarter-final with Rafael Nadal.

19 crore Indian adults don't have bank account: World Bank

WASHINGTON: India has 19 crore adults without a bank account despite the success of the ambitious Jan Dhan Yojana, making it the world’s second largest unbanked population after that of China, the World Bank said on Thursday.

Besides, almost half of the bank accounts remained inactive in the past year, the multilateral financial institution said in a report, even as it lauded the Indian government’s financial inclusion scheme, the Jan Dhan Yojana, for bringing in additional 31 crore Indians into formal banking system by March 2018.

It also said the country’s adult population with a bank account has more than doubled to 80 per cent since 2011. The Jan Dhan Yojana was launched by the Modi government in 2014.

According to the latest Global Findex Database released by the World Bank on the sidelines of the annual Spring meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, 11 per cent of the world’s unbanked adults are in India.

Globally, 69 per cent of adults – 3.8 billion people – now have an account at a bank or mobile money provider, a crucial step in escaping poverty.

This is up from 62 per cent in 2014 and just 51 per cent in 2011. From 2014 to 2017, 515 million adults obtained an account, and 1.2 billion have done so since 2011, according to the Global Findex database.

The bank said China and India, despite having relatively high account ownership, claim large shares of the global unbanked population because of their sheer size.

Home to 225 million adults without an account, China has the world’s largest unbanked population, followed by India (190 million or 19 crore), Pakistan (100 million), and Indonesia (95 million).

The Modi government’s massive push in 2014 to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards has benefited traditionally excluded groups, the World Bank said, but expressed concern that almost half of account owners have an account that remained inactive in the past year.

Part of the explanation might be India’s Jan-Dhan Yojana scheme, developed by the government to increase account ownership, brought an additional 310 million Indians into the formal banking system by March 2018, many of whom might not yet have had an opportunity to use their new account, it said.

In India, the share of adults with an account has more than doubled since 2011, to 80 per cent, the World Bank said, adding that an important factor driving this increase was a government policy launched in 2014 to boost account ownership among unbanked adults through biometric identification cards.

“This policy benefited traditionally excluded groups and helped ensure inclusive growth in account ownership,” the report said.

Between 2014 and 2017, account ownership in India rose by more than 30 percentage points among women as well as among adults in the poorest 40 per cent of households.

Among men and among adults in the wealthiest 60 per cent of households it increased by about 20 percentage points.

The World bank said a strong government push to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards in India helped narrow both the gender gap and the gap between richer and poorer adults.

In India three years ago, men were 20 percentage points more likely than women to have an account.

“Today, India’s gender gap has shrunk to 6 percentage points thanks to a strong government push to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards,” the report said.

Observing that for governments, switching from cash to digital payments can reduce corruption and improve efficiency, the World bank said in India the leakage of funds for pension payments dropped by 47 per cent (2.8 percentage points) when the payments were made through biometric smart cards rather than being handed out in cash.

According to the report, the gender gap in the use of digital payments varies substantially among developing economies.

In India, for example, 42 per cent of male account owners use digital payments, while just 29 per cent of female account owners do, it said.

“In the past few years, we have seen great strides around the world in connecting people to formal financial services,” World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said.

“Financial inclusion allows people to save for family needs, borrow to support a business, or build a cushion against an emergency.

“Having access to financial services is a critical step towards reducing both poverty and inequality, and new data on mobile phone ownership and internet access show unprecedented opportunities to use technology to achieve universal financial inclusion,” he added.

Globally, 1.7 billion adults remain unbanked, yet two-thirds of them own a mobile phone that could help them access financial services.

Digital technology could take advantage of existing cash transactions to bring people into the financial system, the report finds.

In South Asia, the share of adults with an account rose by 23 percentage points, to 70 per cent.

Progress was driven by India, where a government policy to increase financial inclusion through biometric identification pushed the share with an account up to 80 per cent, with big gains among women and poorer adults.

Excluding India, regional account ownership still rose by 12 percentage points–but men often benefited more than women.

19 crore Indian adults don't have bank account: World Bank

WASHINGTON: India has 19 crore adults without a bank account despite the success of the ambitious Jan Dhan Yojana, making it the world’s second largest unbanked population after that of China, the World Bank said on Thursday.

Besides, almost half of the bank accounts remained inactive in the past year, the multilateral financial institution said in a report, even as it lauded the Indian government’s financial inclusion scheme, the Jan Dhan Yojana, for bringing in additional 31 crore Indians into formal banking system by March 2018.

It also said the country’s adult population with a bank account has more than doubled to 80 per cent since 2011. The Jan Dhan Yojana was launched by the Modi government in 2014.

According to the latest Global Findex Database released by the World Bank on the sidelines of the annual Spring meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, 11 per cent of the world’s unbanked adults are in India.

Globally, 69 per cent of adults – 3.8 billion people – now have an account at a bank or mobile money provider, a crucial step in escaping poverty.

This is up from 62 per cent in 2014 and just 51 per cent in 2011. From 2014 to 2017, 515 million adults obtained an account, and 1.2 billion have done so since 2011, according to the Global Findex database.

The bank said China and India, despite having relatively high account ownership, claim large shares of the global unbanked population because of their sheer size.

Home to 225 million adults without an account, China has the world’s largest unbanked population, followed by India (190 million or 19 crore), Pakistan (100 million), and Indonesia (95 million).

The Modi government’s massive push in 2014 to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards has benefited traditionally excluded groups, the World Bank said, but expressed concern that almost half of account owners have an account that remained inactive in the past year.

Part of the explanation might be India’s Jan-Dhan Yojana scheme, developed by the government to increase account ownership, brought an additional 310 million Indians into the formal banking system by March 2018, many of whom might not yet have had an opportunity to use their new account, it said.

In India, the share of adults with an account has more than doubled since 2011, to 80 per cent, the World Bank said, adding that an important factor driving this increase was a government policy launched in 2014 to boost account ownership among unbanked adults through biometric identification cards.

“This policy benefited traditionally excluded groups and helped ensure inclusive growth in account ownership,” the report said.

Between 2014 and 2017, account ownership in India rose by more than 30 percentage points among women as well as among adults in the poorest 40 per cent of households.

Among men and among adults in the wealthiest 60 per cent of households it increased by about 20 percentage points.

The World bank said a strong government push to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards in India helped narrow both the gender gap and the gap between richer and poorer adults.

In India three years ago, men were 20 percentage points more likely than women to have an account.

“Today, India’s gender gap has shrunk to 6 percentage points thanks to a strong government push to increase account ownership through biometric identification cards,” the report said.

Observing that for governments, switching from cash to digital payments can reduce corruption and improve efficiency, the World bank said in India the leakage of funds for pension payments dropped by 47 per cent (2.8 percentage points) when the payments were made through biometric smart cards rather than being handed out in cash.

According to the report, the gender gap in the use of digital payments varies substantially among developing economies.

In India, for example, 42 per cent of male account owners use digital payments, while just 29 per cent of female account owners do, it said.

“In the past few years, we have seen great strides around the world in connecting people to formal financial services,” World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said.

“Financial inclusion allows people to save for family needs, borrow to support a business, or build a cushion against an emergency.

“Having access to financial services is a critical step towards reducing both poverty and inequality, and new data on mobile phone ownership and internet access show unprecedented opportunities to use technology to achieve universal financial inclusion,” he added.

Globally, 1.7 billion adults remain unbanked, yet two-thirds of them own a mobile phone that could help them access financial services.

Digital technology could take advantage of existing cash transactions to bring people into the financial system, the report finds.

In South Asia, the share of adults with an account rose by 23 percentage points, to 70 per cent.

Progress was driven by India, where a government policy to increase financial inclusion through biometric identification pushed the share with an account up to 80 per cent, with big gains among women and poorer adults.

Excluding India, regional account ownership still rose by 12 percentage points–but men often benefited more than women.

Live Score: Kings XI Punjab vs Sunrisers Hyderabad

India to bid for 2026 Youth Olympics, receives appreciation from IOC chief

The Indian Olympic Association decided to bid for the 2026 Youth Olympics as well as the 2032 Summer Olympics, receiving appreciation from the visiting International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach.

India to bid for 2026 Youth Olympics, receives appreciation from IOC chief

The Indian Olympic Association decided to bid for the 2026 Youth Olympics as well as the 2032 Summer Olympics, receiving appreciation from the visiting International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach.


Warning: Illegal string offset 'update_browscap' in /home/meeruefh/public_html/wp-content/plugins/wp-statistics/includes/classes/statistics.class.php on line 157