Impacting Lives of Beginners: Mrs. Neena Bhatia, Principal ABC Public School

Impacting Lives of Beginners: Mrs. Neena Bhatia, Principal ABC Public School

  Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My father was my inspiration in Childhood. He always preached us that luck sure comes at the door and knocks too but your efforts More »

Top of the Town: Ravindra Bhadana, MLA  Indian politician and a member of the 16th Legislative Assembly of Uttar Pradesh of India

Top of the Town: Ravindra Bhadana, MLA Indian politician and a member of the 16th Legislative Assembly of Uttar Pradesh of India

1. आपका बचपन में प्रेरणा स्त्रोत कौन था? मेरे पूज्य बाबाजी स्वर्गीय श्री रामसिंह जी । जो एक कृषक थे, एक सामाजिक व्यक्ति थे। उन्होंने जिंदगी में मुझे जीना सीखाया। प्ररेणा भी More »

Top of the Town: Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd.

Top of the Town: Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd.

Mr. Vikram Parakash Lamba, MD American Institute of English Language Pvt. Ltd. with 300+ Centers all across India Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My mother and father were my source More »

Top of the town: Dr. Mohini Lamba, Director in American Kids Play School, Early Childhood Curriculum Developer, Montessori Teachers Trainer

Top of the town: Dr. Mohini Lamba, Director in American Kids Play School, Early Childhood Curriculum Developer, Montessori Teachers Trainer

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My inspiration was my family. I was surrounded by educators in my family. Ma Nanaji, Mamaji, my mother everybody was into academics. My Mamaji was More »

Top of the Town: Mrs. Monika Kohli, 52 years young model and actor, into print ads, T.V. commercials and movies

Top of the Town: Mrs. Monika Kohli, 52 years young model and actor, into print ads, T.V. commercials and movies

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? I always believed that inspiration is from inside and not from outside. Only you can inspire yourself. Outward inspirations are momentary and do not stay More »

Top of the town: Respected Rajendra Aggarwal, MP

Top of the town: Respected Rajendra Aggarwal, MP

  Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My dad and my uncle were my inspiration in my childhood. Both of them were associated with RSS. They inspired me to join RSS More »

Top of the town: Dr. Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker

Top of the town: Dr. Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker

Dr.Vishwajeet Bembi, renowned Physician and Social Worker Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My mother was my inspiration in my childhood and she is still my inspiration. My brother had also More »

Top of the town: Mr. Rakesh Kohli, Chairman, Stag International known for sporting goods in different countries of the world.

Top of the town: Mr. Rakesh Kohli, Chairman, Stag International known for sporting goods in different countries of the world.

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? My grandfather was my biggest inspiration. I had learnt the minutest details of life from him. I learnt a lot from him about business. Like More »

Top of the town: Mr. Prem Mehta, Principal City Vocational Public School

Top of the town: Mr. Prem Mehta, Principal City Vocational Public School

Who was your inspiration in Childhood ? I think in my childhood it was the national leaders like Gandhi ji and Nehru ji who inspired me the most because our exposure at More »

Top of the town: Dr. Mamta Varshney, Lecturer and Poetess

Top of the town: Dr. Mamta Varshney, Lecturer and Poetess

Who was your inspiration in Childhood? Radio was my source of inspiration as I used to listen to loads of music and radio and tape recorder were the only source to listen More »

 

Who will replace Smith, Warner in IPL?

Will regret my actions for the rest of my life: Cameron Bancroft

Disgraced Australian cricketer Cameron Bancroft asked for forgiveness following the ball tampering row that led to a nine-month ban from international cricket for the 25-year-old. After arriving in Australia, the opening batsman addressed the media at the WACA, Perth and added that he feels like he has everyone down in Australia.

Spinners, Mandhana secure consolation win for India

India finally had something to cheer about as they defeated England by eight wickets to record a consolation win in the women’s T20 tri-series on Thursday.

Malala meets Pak PM on 1st trip home since being shot

ISLAMABAD: Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai returned to her native Pakistan on Thursday, six years after she was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen for advocating greater education of girls.

Yousafzai and her family met Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi in the capital, Islamabad, on her first visit to her homeland since she was airlifted for medical treatment in Britain in 2012.

Clad in a traditional shalwar khameez outfit with her head covered with a red and blue duppata scarf, Yousafzai also met several female Pakistani ministers in the prime minister’s office.

But she is unlikely to travel to her home region of Swat in northwestern Pakistan due to security threats against her, a relative and security sources told Reuters.

“It’s been long-held desire of Malala Yousafzai and her parents to visit Swat and see her relatives and friends. But she was not given permission due to security concerns,” said one relative, who declined to be identified.

Earlier, Pakistan’s Geo TV showed footage of Yousafzai after she arrived at Islamabad airport, walking to a car escorted by security officials.

At the age of 17, Yousafzai became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 for her education advocacy.

In October 2012, masked gunmen stopped a bus taking Malala and some friends home from school and shot her. Two of her friends were also wounded.

Last week, on Twitter, Yousafzai, who is now 20, expressed a longing for her homeland. She now lives in Britain and is studying at Oxford University.

“On this day, I cherish fond memories of home, of playing cricket on rooftops and singing the national anthem in school. Happy Pakistan Day!” she wrote on March 23.

After surviving the attack, Yousafzai was airlifted abroad and underwent surgery.

The Pakistani Taliban, who seized control of her hometown in Pakistan’s Swat Valley before being pushed out by the army in 2009, claimed the attack in response to her blog for the BBC Urdu service advocating girls’ education.

The hardline Islamist movement blew up girls’ schools and imposed a strict interpretation of sharia Islamic law during their rule over Swat.
The Taliban also accused her of promoting Western values in Swat, which is a staunchly conservative parts of the mainly-Muslim nation.

Unable to return to Pakistan after her recovery, Yousafzai moved to Britain, setting up the Malala Fund and supporting education advocacy groups with a focus on Pakistan, Nigeria, Jordan, Syria and Kenya.

This month, a new girls’ school built with her Nobel prize money opened in Shangla, near her home district of Swat.

During her trip to Pakistan, which is expected to last several days, Yousafzai is expected to stay in Islamabad and meet friends and family at a hotel in the capital, her relatives said.

While she is arguably the most recognisable Pakistani in the world, Yousafzai – known almost universally as Malala – is a polarising figure at home.

She is frequently attacked by religious conservatives as portraying her country in a bad light and seeking fame.

Yet on Twitter her return was greeted broadly positively.

“Welcome back to the home land brave young @Malala,” tweeted Syeda Aqraba Fatima.

“One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world, More Power To You #Malala”

North, S Korea fix April date for 1st summit in yrs

SEOUL: North and South Korea will hold their first summit in more than a decade on April 27, South Korean officials said on Thursday, after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un pledged his commitment to denuclearisation as tensions ease between the old foes.
South Korean government officials announced the date of the summit after holding high-level talks with their North Korean counterparts on Thursday.

The two Koreas had agreed earlier this month to hold such a summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom when South Korean President Moon Jae-in sent a delegation to Pyongyang to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Thursday’s talks were the first between the two Koreas since the delegation returned from the North.

A joint statement from the dialogue said two Koreas would hold a working-level meeting on April 4 to discuss details for the summit, such as staffing support, security and news releases.

No details on the summit agenda were released, with Unification Minister Cho Myong-gyon saying the two sides agreed more time was needed to sort out details although they had exchanged opinions on the agenda “fully” on Thursday.

Cho said the summit agenda would largely address denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula and improvement of inter-Korean relations but declined to elaborate further.

“We still have a fair number of issues to resolve on a working-level for preparations over the next month,” said Ri Son Gwon, the chairman of North Korea’s committee for the peaceful reunification of the country in closing remarks to the South Korean delegation.

“But if the two sides deeply understand the historic significance and meaning of this summit and give their all, we will be able to solve all problems swiftly and amicably,” Ri added.

North and South Korea have experienced a significant easing in tensions since the Winter Olympics in the South in February. The are technically still at war after the 1950-53 conflict ended with a ceasefire, not a truce.

Kim is also scheduled to meet U.S. President Donald Trump some time in May to discuss denuclearisation, although a time and place have not been set for that summit.

Kim met Chinese President Xi Jinping in a surprise visit to Beijing this week, his first trip outside the isolated North since he came to power in 2011.

Even more surprising was Kim’s pledge to denuclearise the Korean summit. That commitment was reported by Chinese state media, although North Korea’s official media made no mention of it, or Kim’s anticipated meeting with Trump.

The South Korean unification minister told reporters Kim’s visit to China was not discussed with North Korean officials on Thursday.

Trump and Kim had exchanged threats and insults in recent months. The U.S. leader made the equally surprising announcement earlier this month that he was prepared to meet Kim to discuss the crisis over Pyongyang’s development of nuclear weapons capable of hitting the United States.

The North Korean leader’s engagement with the international community has sparked speculation that he may try to meet other leaders. Japan’s Asahi newspaper said on Thursday Japan had sounded out the North Korean government about a bilateral summit.

Japan’s Foreign Minister Taro Kono left open the possibility that Shinzo Abe might meet Kim at some point. Kono said in an interview with Reuters on Tuesday that Japan was closely watching preparations for the North-South Korean summit and the Trump-Kim meeting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping promised Beijing would uphold its friendship with North Korea after his meeting with Kim.

Trump wrote on Twitter he had received a message from Xi on Tuesday night that his meeting with Kim “went very well” and that Kim looked forward to meeting the U.S. president.

North, S Korea fix April date for 1st summit in yrs

SEOUL: North and South Korea will hold their first summit in more than a decade on April 27, South Korean officials said on Thursday, after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un pledged his commitment to denuclearisation as tensions ease between the old foes.
South Korean government officials announced the date of the summit after holding high-level talks with their North Korean counterparts on Thursday.

The two Koreas had agreed earlier this month to hold such a summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom when South Korean President Moon Jae-in sent a delegation to Pyongyang to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Thursday’s talks were the first between the two Koreas since the delegation returned from the North.

A joint statement from the dialogue said two Koreas would hold a working-level meeting on April 4 to discuss details for the summit, such as staffing support, security and news releases.

No details on the summit agenda were released, with Unification Minister Cho Myong-gyon saying the two sides agreed more time was needed to sort out details although they had exchanged opinions on the agenda “fully” on Thursday.

Cho said the summit agenda would largely address denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula and improvement of inter-Korean relations but declined to elaborate further.

“We still have a fair number of issues to resolve on a working-level for preparations over the next month,” said Ri Son Gwon, the chairman of North Korea’s committee for the peaceful reunification of the country in closing remarks to the South Korean delegation.

“But if the two sides deeply understand the historic significance and meaning of this summit and give their all, we will be able to solve all problems swiftly and amicably,” Ri added.

North and South Korea have experienced a significant easing in tensions since the Winter Olympics in the South in February. The are technically still at war after the 1950-53 conflict ended with a ceasefire, not a truce.

Kim is also scheduled to meet U.S. President Donald Trump some time in May to discuss denuclearisation, although a time and place have not been set for that summit.

Kim met Chinese President Xi Jinping in a surprise visit to Beijing this week, his first trip outside the isolated North since he came to power in 2011.

Even more surprising was Kim’s pledge to denuclearise the Korean summit. That commitment was reported by Chinese state media, although North Korea’s official media made no mention of it, or Kim’s anticipated meeting with Trump.

The South Korean unification minister told reporters Kim’s visit to China was not discussed with North Korean officials on Thursday.

Trump and Kim had exchanged threats and insults in recent months. The U.S. leader made the equally surprising announcement earlier this month that he was prepared to meet Kim to discuss the crisis over Pyongyang’s development of nuclear weapons capable of hitting the United States.

The North Korean leader’s engagement with the international community has sparked speculation that he may try to meet other leaders. Japan’s Asahi newspaper said on Thursday Japan had sounded out the North Korean government about a bilateral summit.

Japan’s Foreign Minister Taro Kono left open the possibility that Shinzo Abe might meet Kim at some point. Kono said in an interview with Reuters on Tuesday that Japan was closely watching preparations for the North-South Korean summit and the Trump-Kim meeting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping promised Beijing would uphold its friendship with North Korea after his meeting with Kim.

Trump wrote on Twitter he had received a message from Xi on Tuesday night that his meeting with Kim “went very well” and that Kim looked forward to meeting the U.S. president.

Graduation day for toddlers in Aurangabad

New Zealand bans entry to any Russian expelled by allies

WELLINGTON: New Zealand will not allow entry to Russian diplomats expelled by other countries in response to a nerve agent attack on a former Russian spy in Britain, that Britain has blamed on Russia, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on Thursday.
The attempted murder of Sergie Skripal, a former colonel in Russian military intelligence who betrayed dozens of Russian agents to Britain’s MI6 spy service, has plunged Moscow’s relations with the West to a new post-Cold War low.

After Britain expelled 23 Russians it said were spies working under diplomatic cover, Russia followed by throwing out 23 British diplomats. The United States and other Western countries, including most member states of the European Union and NATO, expelled more than 100 diplomats.

New Zealand has not expelled any Russians, which Ardern earlier justified by saying there were no Russian spies present at the Russian embassy in New Zealand for her government to expel, unlike the situation in other intelligence partners.

She said on Thursday she would ask allies for the names of the Russians they expelled and they would not be allowed into New Zealand to protest against Russia’s “inadequate response” to the attack in Britain.

“Those names will then be placed on a travel ban list to ensure that individuals who have been found to undertake activities incompatible with their diplomatic status in other countries do not enter New Zealand,” she said in a statement.

Some politicians had earlier criticised Ardern for not taking a harder stance against Russia, and risking a rift with the Pacific nation’s Western allies.

“The perception is that the original response wasn’t strong enough and therefore they’re trying to make up for it,” Robert Ayson, professor of security studies at the Victoria University in Wellington, said of the travel ban.

“It does look like a bit of scramble.”

Rhys Ball, a Massey University security analyst who formerly worked for New Zealand’s intelligence service, said the government’s block on the expelled Russians was largely a gesture.

“It’s a very lightweight effort … those undeclared intelligence officers are essentially what we would describe as ‘blown’ now and they’re not going to travel to any other country any time soon,” Ball said.

Some analysts see the government’s decision not to expel any Russians as one the first major international missteps for the charismatic Ardern, whose centre-left Labour government took the helm in October.

Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Winston Peters told Parliament on Wednesday that most of Russia’s spying activity on New Zealand took place from offshore.

68 dead after riot, fire at police station in Venezuela

VALENCIA: Venezuela‘s chief prosecutor reported late Wednesday that 68 people died in a fire that swept through the cell area inside a police station, which townspeople said followed a disturbance by detainees being held there.
Attorney General Tarek William Saab said on his official Twitter account that nearly all the dead were prisoners. He said two women who were staying overnight at the station were also killed, but didn’t provide any further details.

Saab said four prosecutors had been named to determine what happened at the state police headquarters in Valencia, a town in Carabobo state about 100 miles (160 kilometers) west of Caracas.

It was one of the worst jail disasters in a country where human rights groups complain about bad prison conditions. A fire at a prison in the western state of Zulia killed more than 100 inmates in 1994.

Local authorities in Valencia had confirmed earlier only that there were fatalities, and said they were working to determine an exact number. They said they were not providing any estimates “out of respect for the families.”

Angry relatives who gathered outside the station said dozens of detainees had been kept in squalid conditions at the station and expressed fear that their loved ones were dead.

Dozens of men and women demanding to know if their loved ones had survived clashed with police officers in riot gear. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowd.

“I don’t know if my son is dead or alive!” cried Aida Parra, who said she last saw her son a day before, when she went to deliver him food. “They haven’t told me anything.”

A Window to Freedom, a nonprofit group that monitors conditions at Venezuela’s jails, said preliminary but unconfirmed information indicated the riot began when an armed detainee shot an officer in the leg. Shortly after that a fire broke out, with flames growing quickly as the blaze spread to mattresses in the cells, it said. Rescuers apparently had to break a hole through a wall to free some of the prisoners inside.

Photos shared by the group showed prisoners being taken out on stretchers, their limbs frozen in awkward positions as skin peeled off.

A Window to Freedom’s director, Carlos Nieto Palma, said officials should be held accountable for failing to address deteriorating conditions in police station jails. The group said overcrowding has become common throughout the country as detainees are kept long past customary brief holding periods before being sent to other larger jails before trial or freed.

“It’s grave and alarming,” Nieto Palma said. “What happened today in Carabobo is a sign of that.”

Outside the police station, some relatives buried their hands in their faces as tears streamed down their cheeks. Others had to be held up with the support of friends and family as they collapsed in despair. Still others wept quietly and clutched their hands in prayer.

Nearby, National Guard troops wearing bullet-proof vests and carrying rifles across their backs walked in and out of the station. Fire trucks and ambulances stood outside, and unused stretchers leaned against a wall.

Opposition lawmaker Juan Miguel Matheus demanded that the pro-government leader of Carabobo state inform relatives about what had happened.

“The desperation of relatives should not be played with,” he said.

Clashes between prisoners and guards are not uncommon in Venezuela. Inmates are frequently able to obtain weapons and drugs with the help of corrupt guards and heavily armed groups control cellblock fiefdoms.

Watch: Mahira’s stunning dance performance

In a few videos that have surfaced on Instagram, the actress can be seen dancing her heart out at a friend’s mehendi ceremony.