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Trump, Macron call for 'new' nuclear deal with Iran

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump and French counterpart Emmanuel Macron called for a “new” deal with Iran Tuesday, looking beyond disagreements over a landmark nuclear accord that still hangs in the balance.
Trump laid transatlantic divisions bare during a visit by the French president, pillorying a three-year old agreement designed to curb Iran’s nuclear program.

The US leader described the deal as “insane” and “ridiculous,” despite European pleas for him not to walk away.

Instead, Trump eyed a broader “deal” that would also limit Iran’s ballistic missile program and support for militant groups across the Middle East.

“I think we will have a great shot at doing a much bigger, maybe, deal,” said Trump, stressing that any new accord would have to be built on “solid foundations.”

“They should have made a deal that covered Yemen, that covered Syria,” said Trump. “No matter where you go in the Middle East, you see the fingerprints of Iran behind problems.”

Macron admitted after meeting Trump that he did not know whether the US president would walk away from the nuclear deal when a May 12 decision deadline comes up.

“I can say that we have had very frank discussions on that, just the two of us,” Macron told a joint press conference with Trump at his side.

Putting on a brave face, he said he wished “for now to work on a new deal with Iran” of which the nuclear accord could be one part.

Neither Trump nor Macron indicated whether Iran would get something in return for concessions on its ballistic programs, activities in the Middle East or extending nuclear controls beyond 2025.

Trump — true to his background in reality TV — teased his looming decision.

“This is a deal with decayed foundations. It’s a bad deal, it’s a bad structure. It’s falling down,” the US leader said. “We’re going to see what happens on the 12th.”

Trump’s European allies have repeatedly tried to persuade him not to abandon the 2015 deal, which gave Iran massive sanctions relief and the guarantee of a civilian nuclear program in return for limiting enrichment that could produce weapons grade fuel.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will renew those calls when she visits Washington on Friday.

Iran, meanwhile, has warned it will ramp up enrichment if Trump walks away from the accord, prompting a blunt warning from the US leader.

“They’re not going to be restarting anything. If they restart it, they’re going to have big problems, bigger than they ever had before. And you can mark it down,” he said.

For months American and European officials have been working behind the scenes trying to find a compromise on Iran that allows the mercurial US president to claim a public victory, while keeping the deal intact.

More hawkish American officials accuse Europeans — particularly Germany — of putting business interests ahead of security, and of opposing a tougher stance against Iran to safeguard investments in the Islamic Republic.

That charge is sharply rejected by European officials, who are increasingly frustrated at spending time dealing with Trump’s complaints rather than tackling Iran’s behavior.

The disagreement threatens to plunge transatlantic relations to their lowest point since the Iraq War.

Trump’s comments on Iran contrasts markedly with the exuberant welcome he gave the French leader.

Tuesday morning both men waxed lyrical about shared heroes of yore — from the Marquis de Lafayette to Alexis de Tocqueville — as they listened to strains of “La Marseillaise” and “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

Later, the Trumps rolled out the red carpet for the Macrons once more at a lavish state dinner — of which the US first lady was said to have fine-tuned every last detail, from gold tableware to white floral centerpieces, for star guests including Apple CEO Tim Cook and media mogul Rupert Murdoch.

Melania Trump dazzled in a sequined Chanel dress of black Chantilly lace, while Brigitte Macron stepped out in a long-sleeved creamy white gown with gold lattice detailing by Louis Vuitton.

“May our friendship grow even deeper, may our kinship grow even stronger, and may our sacred liberty never die,” Trump said in his toast to the Macrons.

In turn, the French leader spoke at length of “how deep, how strong, and how intense the relationship is between our two countries,” and marveled at the unforeseen rapport he has forged with Trump.

“I got to know you, you got to know me. We both know that none of us easily changes our minds, but we will work together, and we have this ability to listen to one another,” he said.

The key question is whether Macron can translate that privileged relationship into concrete results — as he also pushes for a permanent exemption for Europe from US steel and aluminum tariffs.

Earlier in the Oval Office, Trump offered a striking — and slightly awkward — sign of their much-vaunted intimacy.

“We have a very special relationship, in fact I’ll get that little piece of dandruff off,” Trump said, swiping something off Macron’s jacket. “We have to make him perfect — he is perfect.”

First lady dazzles at state dinner amid moment in spotlight

WASHINGTON: Stepping out of the background and into the spotlight, Melania Trump dazzled at her first state dinner Tuesday, providing some much-needed sparkle at an event lacking in star power.

After ditching her trademark dark sunglasses for a white skirt suit and hat earlier in the day, the first lady appeared in a Chanel gown to greet President Emmanuel Macron of France and his wife, Brigitte, as they arrived for the first state dinner of Trump’s administration.

It was a big moment in fashion _ and public life _ for the former model, who has kept a relatively low profile since Trump took office and who is playing hostess at her highest-profile event yet as her husband faces a mounting legal threat from a porn actress who says she was paid to keep quiet about a sexual encounter with Trump, which he denies.

With her first state dinner, Mrs. Trump seemed to be aiming to make a statement. In a nod to France, she wore a black Chantilly lace Chanel haute couture gown, hand-painted with silver and embroidered with crystal and sequins, according to her spokeswoman. Her French counterpart wore Louis Vuitton.

As the Trumps greeted the Macrons, a collection of political and business elite entered the formal dinner, which featured a smaller, more intimate guest list than some of President Barack Obama’s dinners. Among those attending were Vice President Mike Pence, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Apple CEO Tim Cook and two Winter Olympians, who flashed their gold medals on their way into the pre-dinner reception.

Kissinger, 94, caused a little scare when he stumbled while walking past the news media.

Ivanka Trump, a senior White House adviser and the president’s elder daughter, and Louise Linton, the wife of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, wowed in designer gowns. But there were no surprise celebrity guests, in contrast with past years.

Asked what she was looking forward to, Linton said: “Everything French!”

In a break with tradition, Trump excluded congressional Democrats and journalists. But some Democrats did make the cut, including Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards.

The White House stressed that Mrs. Trump, who planned her 2005 wedding, had a hand in every detail of what is the social denouement of Macron’s visit. She released a brief video showing her working on the details with her staff, including the menu and the cream-and-gold table settings.

More than 130 guests, seated at round candle-lit tables decorated with bouquets of white flowers, were dining on rack of lamb and nectarine tart served on a mix of china settings from the presidencies of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. After-dinner entertainment will be courtesy of the Washington National Opera.

Earlier Tuesday, Mrs. Trump wore a stylish belted suit with a broad-brimmed chapeau for her public appearances, including on a brief outing to the National Gallery of Art with Mrs. Macron to view an exhibit of works by French painter Paul Cezanne.

The hat stayed put as she returned to the White House and took her front-row seat in the East Room for the president’s joint news conference with Macron. It bobbed up and down across the bottom of television screens as she entered the room and again as she rose to leave, spawning many a Twitter meme.

The hat was designed by Herve Pierre and the skirt suit was by Michael Kors.

Mrs. Trump’s white outfit Tuesday recalled another high-profile occasion, the president’s first State of the Union address, when the first lady wore a white pantsuit. Trump gave the speech shortly after news broke earlier this year that his personal attorney had paid adult-film star Stormy Daniels $130,000 just before the 2016 presidential election to keep quiet about a sexual encounter Trump says didn’t happen.

Inquiring minds wondered what kind of statement the first lady sought to make with her attire.

Mrs. Trump was largely absent from Washington during the first six months of the administration, opting to continue living full time at the family’s Trump Tower penthouse in New York City so their now-12-year-old son, Barron, wouldn’t have to change schools in the middle of the year.

She was rarely seen _ and even more rarely heard _ during those months, even after she finally moved to Washington last June.

But she seems to be trying to change that, even pushing back publicly against her critics. She recently convened a White House discussion on cyberbullying, an issue she identified as her platform despite her husband’s penchant for belittling and berating his foes on Twitter. She acknowledged that people were skeptical of her commitment to curb cyberbullying but said it would not stop her from doing what she believes is right: helping children and the next generation.

A unified Korea? Leaders bring contrasting visions to summit

SEOUL: Unification is an idea that moves most Koreans, North and South, on an emotional level.

For some, especially young people in the South, it may not be a burning issue. Details like the costs, the risks and what specifically both sides stand to gain are rarely given much thought by anyone who isn’t an academic, politician or activist.

But when North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in meet on Friday, the prospect of unification, even if only in the abstract, will loom large around them.

Can Kim’s nuclear-armed North and the K-pop capitalism of Moon’s South ever merge into One Korea? Both leaders come to the table with distinct visions of what that would look like. And they are very different.

THE DEMOCRATIC FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF KORYO

After failing to take the South by force in the 1950s, North Korea’s founder and “eternal president,” Kim Il Sung, announced a plan for what he thought a unified Korea should look like back in 1980.

He called it the Democratic Federal Republic of Koryo. Koryo was an ancient Korean kingdom from which the word Korea is derived.

Kim’s plan was for an arrangement something along the lines of what Hong Kong has with China, a unified nation with two separate systems of government.

Under his plan, the North and South would respect each other’s ideology, social system and autonomy. Both sides would have an equal number of representatives in a supreme national assembly with equal rights and responsibilities. The assembly would also have representatives of Koreans overseas. It would have a standing committee that would administer state affairs.

Kim stressed the need for this new federation to remain neutral and independent, avoiding in particular military alliances with others.

Not surprisingly, that looks a lot like North Korea today, with its Supreme People’s Assembly, and the party’s Politburo and Central Committee overseeing day-to-day policies. Even the name smacks of the North, which is officially the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

An equal number of assembly seats would be a good deal for the North, which has half the South’s population. The inclusion of Koreans overseas would boost that advantage even further since, for historical reasons, more often than not they have at least nominal allegiance to Pyongyang, not Seoul.

With so many devils lurking in the details, Kim’s grand plan has never gotten much traction.

A KOREAN COMMONWEALTH AND BEYOND

South Korea’s three-step proposal ends in a similarly predictable place: its own system writ large across the peninsula.

The first priority, according to South Korea’s Unification Ministry, is to develop a sustainable relationship and resolve the issue of North Korea’s development of nuclear weapons.

Seoul wants to substitute the unstable armistice that ended the fighting of the 1950-53 Korean War with a permanent peace treaty _ a goal Pyongyang shares. This step could get a boost on Friday _ it will almost certainly be taken up then and probably again at the summit between Kim and President Donald Trump in May or early June.

South Korea wants to then develop trust and cooperation to the point where a sort of national consensus has been achieved. After a transitional commonwealth period, the next step would be the formation of a single market on the Korean Peninsula “to create new growth engines and create an inter-Korean economic community of coexistence and co-prosperity.”

“We will build a new economic order that will bring peace and prosperity to the Korean Peninsula and Northeast Asia,” the ministry concludes.

The essentials of this plan were announced by President Roh Tae-woo in September 1989.

The succession of administrations that have taken office in the South since Roh have adhered fairly predictably to the principle of gradual, peaceful progress, while calibrating their willingness to engage with Pyongyang based on their assessment of its level of vulnerability or hostility.

In the long run, however, it makes no provision for a one-state, two-system future.

Ultimately, Seoul believes, the North Korean system has to go.

Trump says North Korea must 'get rid of their nukes'

Donald Trump says North Korea must ‘get rid of their nukes’ – Times of India

AFP | Apr 24, 2018, 22:59 IST

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump on Tuesday called on North Korea to abandon its nuclear program, when pressed about his definition of “denuclearization” ahead of an expected summit with the North’s leader Kim Jong Un.

“It means they get rid of their nukes — very simple,” Trump told a joint press conference with French President Emmanuel Macron.

“It would be very easy for me to make a simple deal and claim victory. I don’t want to do that. I want them to get rid of their nukes.”

Kim has said he is willing to discuss “denuclearization” with Trump, but Pyongyang consistently defines the term as “denuclearization of the Korean peninsula” – code for the removal of America’s military presence in the South.

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Trump flicks 'dandruff' off Macron's suit

Macron: Trump flicks ‘dandruff’ off Macron’s suit – Times of India

PTI | Apr 24, 2018, 22:50 IST

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump brushed off what he said was “dandruff” from the coat of the visiting French counterpart Emanuel Macron.
When Trump was spotted by reporters brushing something off Macron’s suit coat, he said it was dandruff.

“We have a very special relationship, in fact I’ll get that little piece of dandruff off,” he said.

“We have to make him perfect – he is perfect,” Trump said.

Macron is in the US for a three-day visit to the capital, which kicked off yesterday.

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Britain's Charles voices 'great joy' at new royal baby

LONDON: Prince Charles voiced his joy today at the arrival of his third grandchild, as Britain waited to discover what Prince William and his wife Kate will call their new baby son.
Cannons were fired in London to mark the arrival of the little prince, who is fifth in line to the throne, and the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out in celebration.

The boy, weighing eight pounds and seven ounces (3.8 kilogrammes), was born at 11:01 am (1001 GMT) on Monday with William present for the birth.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge left St. Mary’s Hospital in London around seven hours later, showing off their baby to the world’s media and royal fanatics camped outside.

William’s 69-year-old father Charles, the heir to the throne, said he and his wife Camilla were thrilled to have a new addition to the family.

The new baby is the younger brother of William and Kate’s children Prince George, four, and two-year-old Princess Charlotte.

“We are both so pleased at the news,” Charles said in a statement.

“It is a great joy to have another grandchild. The only trouble is I don’t know how I am going to keep up with them.” William, 35, and 36-year-old Kate are back at their Kensington Palace home in London.

As he left the hospital on Monday, the duke told reporters he was “very happy, very delighted,” adding: “Thrice the worry now.”

Kensington Palace said the baby’s name would be announced “in due course”.

Betting shops had Arthur as their favourite, followed by James, Albert, Philip, Alexander, Henry and Michael.

“Arthur is the hot favourite at the moment,” said Harry Aitkenhead, spokesman for bookmakers Coral.

“James, Albert and Philip have also been backed and anything else would be a major shock.” Jessica Bridge of Ladbrokes said: “Arthur might be the favourite with the bookies, but it’s actually James that’s the favourite with punters.” Official commemorative souvenirs are already on sale, despite the prince’s name being unknown.

The Royal Collection china is decorated with gold ribbons, silver pompoms and a coronet-inspired pattern.

The plates and pillboxes bear the words: “Welcome to our new royal baby.” The birth was marked Tuesday by bell ringing at London’s Westminster Abbey, where William and Kate were married in 2011 in a ceremony watched by up to two billion people worldwide.

They rang “a full peal of Cambridge Surprise Royal”, the abbey said.

The birth was also to be celebrated with a 41-gun salute in London’s Hyde Park, while 62 rounds were fired near the Tower of London.

Britain’s overseas territories were also celebrating, with a 21-gun salute due to be fired in Gibraltar and a single round gun salute and rifle volley planned in Bermuda.

Thailand says it's willing to host Trump-Kim summit

Thailand says it’s willing to host Trump-Kim summit – Times of India

AP | Apr 24, 2018, 18:30 IST

BANGKOK: Thailand’s foreign minister says his country is willing and able to host a meeting between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but says no plans have been made to do so.

Foreign minister Don Pramudwinai was responding to questions Tuesday from reporters who noted that Bangkok was one of several possible venues mentioned for such a summit, which Trump said could take place in early June to discuss North Korea‘s denuclearization.

Don told them Thailand was able to help with such a meeting, and had done so in the past. He said Thailand was following the issue, but there was “no progress yet” and it is a “delicate subject.”

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Mummified body found in Iran could be father of last shah

DUBAI (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES): A mummified body discovered near the site of a former royal mausoleum in Iran may be the remains of the late Reza Shah Pahlavi, the founder of the Pahlavi dynasty and the father of the country’s last shah.
The recent find of the gauze-wrapped body — and the speculation it triggered — puts new hurdles in the way of the Islamic Republic’s efforts to fully erase the country’s dynastic past, which includes the jack-hammered destruction of the autocrat’s tomb immediately after the 1979 revolution.

Yet, as disaffection and economic problems grow ahead of the Islamic Revolution’s 40th anniversary, mystique around Iran’s age of monarchies persists even with its own history of abuses.

Reza Shah’s grandson, the US-based exiled Crown Prince Reza Pahlavi, already tweeted about it as forensic experts in Iran try to determine whose body they found.

Construction workers discovered the mummified remains while working at the Shiite shrine of Abdul Azim, whose minarets once rose behind Reza Shah’s own mausoleum. A digger pulling away dirt and debris uncovered the body, according to the semi-official ISNA news agency.

Pictures of the body, as well as construction workers posing with it, quickly ricocheted across social media in Iran.

A spokesman for the shrine dismissed the idea of a mummy being found there. However, Hassan Khalilabadi, the head of Tehran City Council’s cultural heritage and tourism committee, was quoted by the state-run IRNA news agency on Monday that it’s “possible” the mummy is the body of Reza Shah.

Authorities say they’ll need to conduct DNA tests to confirm whose body it is.

State television has yet to report on the find, likely due to complications that mentioning the Pahlavis can entail.

State media typically refer to the Persian dynasties, including the Pahlavis, as “despotic,” focusing on the abuses of the monarchy’s feared SAVAK intelligence agency and their once-lavish lifestyles.

Reza Shah’s own rise gave birth to modern Iran itself, then still called Persia until he ordered foreign diplomats to cease using the name. He came to power in 1925, ruling as an absolute autocrat who used taxes and the country’s burgeoning oil revenues to rapidly modernize the nation.

His decisions echo today, particularly his 1936 decree banning women from wearing long, flowing black robes known as chadors. He ordered men to wear Western clothes and bring their wives to public functions with their hair uncovered, borrowing from the secularization of Turkey’s first President Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, a contemporary.

The ban became a source of humiliation for some pious Muslim women in the country. Shiite clerics, angry over his secular beliefs, purges and mass arrests of opponents, held grudges that would foment the coming revolution. Controversies over the chador and hijab persist in Iran today .

Iran’s strong trade ties with Germany, Reza Shah’s push for neutrality amid the coming of World War II and Western fears over its oil supplies falling to the Nazis ultimately sparked a Russian-British invasion of the country in 1941. Reza Shah abdicated in favor of his son, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, at the insistence of the occupying British forces.

Reza Shah ended up in South Africa, dying there in 1944. His body was taken to Cairo, mummified and held for years before returning to Iran. A grand mausoleum near Tehran held his body for years, which then-President Richard Nixon visited in 1972.

After 1979, however, Islamists viewed the mausoleum as an affront.

Iranian cleric Ayatollah Sadegh Khalkhali, who ordered the executions of hundreds after the revolution, led a mob of supporters who used sledgehammers, jack hammers and other tools to demolish the mausoleum.

Khalkhali later would write in his memoirs that he believed the shah’s family took Reza Shah’s body when they fled the country. The shah’s family, however, maintained the body remained in Iran. His son Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was buried in Cairo after dying of cancer in 1980.

Today, Iran’s youth remain fascinated by the time before the revolution. Television period pieces have focused on the Pahlavi dynasty, including the recent state TV series “The Enigma of the Shah,” the most expensive series ever produced to air in the country. While incorporating romances or mobsters into the tales, all shows uniformly criticize the royal court.

Reza Shah’s grandson, Reza Pahlavi, has seen his profile rise following the election of President Donald Trump, who appears to hold the future of the Iran nuclear deal in the balance. From exile, the crown prince has agitated for an end to Iran’s theocracy — though gauging national sentiment about restoring the monarchy remains impossible.

Pahlavi took to Twitter on Monday night to tell Iranian officials he is watching what they will do next with the body.

“I warn the responsible authorities not to hide anything,” he wrote.

Egypt former anti-corruption chief gets 5-year jail term

CAIRO: An Egyptian military court Tuesday sentenced a former anti-corruption chief, Hisham Geneina, to five years in jail after he said a presidential candidate had secret documents allegedly damaging to the army, his lawyer said.
“The verdict is five years, and we’re doing the appeal (procedure) now,” lawyer Ali Taha said.

The military detained Geneina in February accusing him of “spreading news that harms the armed forces” following an interview he gave to Huffpost Arabi, the Arabic version of the US news site.

Taha said he was convicted on the same charge.

Geneina had been a top campaign aide to General Sami Anan, a former armed forces chief of staff whom the military also detained after he announced he would stand in last month’s presidential election against Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who swept to victory for a second term.

Geneina had said Anan allegedly possessed documents on “political events and crises that Egyptian society has passed through” since the 2011 uprising which toppled veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak.

He said the documents were being held at a “secure” location abroad and could be released if Anan was harmed.

Moataz Wadnan, the journalist who conducted the interview, was also arrested.

Geneina, a qualified judge, was sacked by Sisi as head of the Central Auditing Authority in 2016 after he was accused of exaggerating the cost of corruption in Egypt.

Asean summit to focus on Myanmar, South China Sea

SINGAPORE: Southeast Asian leaders will focus on trade wars, the crisis in Myanmar and security tensions in the disputed South China Sea at a summit this weekend, but it’s highly unlikely there will be any headline-grabbing progress on the issues.
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), formed more than half a century ago, has historically struggled with challenges facing the region because it works only by consensus and is reluctant to get involved in any matter deemed to be internal to any of its members.

The summit is being hosted by Singapore, an island state of 5.6 million people that is the smallest in the 10-member bloc, but the wealthiest and most westernised. The group also includes developing countries like Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, as well as nations like the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Vietnam.

Asked why Asean took so long to take action on regional challenges, Singapore Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan said: “We can only do something if we get consensus. We need to do that because no other regional grouping has such diversity.

“But when Asean does decide and it does get moving, because there is consensus, I think we can do so effectively,” he said in an interview.

Singapore’s largest-selling newspaper, the Straits Times, said last year that even Asean’s five founding members took distinct approaches to issues facing the grouping.

The Philippines, it said, “demands ‘a legal basis’ for everything, while Singapore tends to ask ‘What is in it for us?'”

“Malaysia refers everything back to its government, Thailand prefers rule by committee, and Indonesia wants everything in step with its Pancasila (five-principle) philosophy.”

The situation in Myanmar’s western state of Rakhine, where hundreds of thousands of minority Rohingya Muslims have fled for neighbouring Bangladesh after a military crackdown, is one of the biggest challenges facing the group. The United Nations has said there is growing evidence that genocide has been committed.

“What you’re witnessing now is a disaster, it’s a human tragedy,” Balakrishnan said.

He said Asean’s focus had been on stopping the violence and delivering assistance but added: “The political responsibility and accountability have to be with the Myanmar government. They have to find a political solution.”

Buddhist-majority Myanmar denies accusations of widespread abuses and has asked for “clear evidence”.

Work in progress

Asean hopes that a code of conduct it is negotiating with China will ease the dispute in the South China Sea, one of the world’s most volatile hotspots and one of its busiest waterways.

Balakrishnan said substantial work had been done on the code in recent months, but it was still a work in progress.

“Frankly I was pleasantly surprised that we could actually put it all down in a single document, albeit with lots of square brackets and they are not necessarily reconcilable yet,” he said.

Singapore has previously said it would be “unrealistic” to expect an agreement on the code to be reached within a year, after talks began late last year. Critics have said the code, which is expected to be non-binding, would only be an incremental step since it would not force China to back-track on its moves.

Malaysia, Taiwan, Brunei, Vietnam and the Philippines all claim some or all of the South China Sea. China says it owns most of the waterway and has been aggressively building and militarising artificial islands.

Negotiations on the code of conduct have moved as well as they could under the difficult circumstances, Balakrishnan said. “Are the territorial issues resolved? No, of course not. Those will take years, if not generations,” he said.

Asean foreign and finance ministers will gather ahead of the summit and were likely to voice concern on trade tensions between the United States and China.

“From an Asean perspective, the ideal world is one in which America, Japan, China and Europe get along and work within agreed multilateral rules adjudicated by multilateral institutions … like the WTO,” Balakrishnan said.

“We think it’s a good idea,” he said, referring to the World Trade Organisation, which US President Donald Trump has called “a catastrophe” and “a disaster” for the United States.

“We do not wish to see unilateral imposition of trade measures, no matter how they argue them. Take it to the WTO, accept multilateral institutions, multilateral rules,” Balakrishnan said.


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